the-drawing-center:

Check out this great interview in Art Journal with Suzanne Lacy and Andrea Bowers!
Read excerpts below for their insights into the motivation for and nature of their collaborations: 
Lacy: “For both of us, it takes a bit of courage to work together. Andrea did not need me for her exhibition, and our work strategies are very different. Our connection grew out of her spirit of curiosity about women of my generation, and those who came a bit before, and her genuine commitment to activism”
Bowers:  “I needed to create an alternative model for myself, I knew all these amazing women artists were in Los Angeles- and I was scared to death, but I wanted to learn from them, and I wanted to create an alternative model of mentorship that was familiar rather than dysfunctional.”
Lacy: “To look underneath the form of the work, to ask meaningful questions about feminist values across generations – this is where Andrea and I come together” 
Read more HERE. 
Andrea Bowers and Suzanne Lacy: Drawing Lessons is a nine-day installation at The Drawing Center in which artist Andrea Bowers will attempt to rectify this essential artistic illiteracy in Lacy’s oeuvre. Andrea Bowers and Suzanne Lacy: Drawing Lessons will consist of drawing lessons provided by Bowers over the course of nine days as a platform for conversations; resultant drawings; video projection; and the installation of the lesson environment—lights, platform, drawing easels, etc.
Image: Andrea Bowers, Educate, Agitate, Organize, channel letter signs, low voltage LED lights, plexiglass, aluminum, ea, sign 27 X 66 1/2 X 5 in, 2010. 

the-drawing-center:

Check out this great interview in Art Journal with Suzanne Lacy and Andrea Bowers!

Read excerpts below for their insights into the motivation for and nature of their collaborations: 

Lacy: “For both of us, it takes a bit of courage to work together. Andrea did not need me for her exhibition, and our work strategies are very different. Our connection grew out of her spirit of curiosity about women of my generation, and those who came a bit before, and her genuine commitment to activism”

Bowers:  “I needed to create an alternative model for myself, I knew all these amazing women artists were in Los Angeles- and I was scared to death, but I wanted to learn from them, and I wanted to create an alternative model of mentorship that was familiar rather than dysfunctional.”

Lacy: “To look underneath the form of the work, to ask meaningful questions about feminist values across generations – this is where Andrea and I come together” 

Read more HERE

Andrea Bowers and Suzanne Lacy: Drawing Lessons is a nine-day installation at The Drawing Center in which artist Andrea Bowers will attempt to rectify this essential artistic illiteracy in Lacy’s oeuvre. Andrea Bowers and Suzanne Lacy: Drawing Lessons will consist of drawing lessons provided by Bowers over the course of nine days as a platform for conversations; resultant drawings; video projection; and the installation of the lesson environment—lights, platform, drawing easels, etc.

Image: Andrea Bowers, Educate, Agitate, Organize, channel letter signs, low voltage LED lights, plexiglass, aluminum, ea, sign 27 X 66 1/2 X 5 in, 2010. 

@6 hours ago with 17 notes

"In an era when the state has disintegrated to the degree where it can no longer attend to the needs of the people, artists who work in the community need to consciously develop organizing and critical skills among the people with whom they work.” - Yolanda Lopez"

 Mapping the Terrain: New Genre Public Art, Suzanne Lacy (via foto-curious)
@6 hours ago with 2 notes

"Potential audiences are real people found in real spaces."

Suzanne Lacy (via svaartpractice)
@6 hours ago with 6 notes

(Source: newergenres)

@6 hours ago with 1 note

"I feel a great sense of freedom and relief because I moved my art practice away from the concerns of the art world. My creative work is deeper and more fulfilling. The way I am working creatively is not different, the context is different, the timeline is different and the shape of the product is different.
Jules Rochielle"

@6 hours ago with 11 notes

creativetime:

Opens tomorrow! “Social in Practice: The Art of Collaboration,” curated by art historian Deborah Willis and her son, artist Hank Willis Thomas.

“Focused on the use of community collaboration and activism in art making, the multimedia exhibition features artists, collectives and organizations based in New York and around the world.”

@6 hours ago with 27 notes

Grants that ask for artist's intentions and not their fully formed ideas... 

alexandrawinters:

An idea I suggested in my presentation for Policy for my MA assignment last week has been put into practice in the USA for some time now - Jen Delos Reyes explains how this works and gives some insight into Open Engagement - a conference who I have been lucky enough to be coordinating the social media or this year.

@6 hours ago with 3 notes

engagenamac:

Two cool social practice / community-engaged art projects from Sukjong Hong (top), Bridget Bartolini, and Laundromat Project

Beauty in Her Own Words (Sukjong Hong)

Sukjong Hong hopes to create bridges between new residents and established residents through visual art and storytelling in a beauty salon in Woodside, Queens. Inspired by the stories of immigrant women, Hong will interview customers and neighbors and offer visual art and writing workshops to create magazine ‘spreads’ about each woman who has shared her story. The project will culminate in a launch party for the magazine that will highlight the stories documented as well as the limited idea of society’s standards of beauty. The goal is that the creative work, both in writing and visual, will serve as a model for how sharing stories can build bonds and bridges in a rapidly changing neighborhood, and for getting beyond a customer-vendor relationship to something more meaningful.

Neighborhood Portrait Series (Bridget Bartolini)

The Neighborhood Portrait Series will be a sequence of city-wide community events that will invite people to come together and share stories about their neighborhood thus creating a “portrait” of the neighborhood as seen by its own community members. In addition to personal stories, the events will showcase poetry, music, and other art inspired by the neighborhood as well as open discussion forums and participatory activities that offer avenues for all attendees to participate. The goal is to strengthen community connections and build a neighborly spirit through the sharing of stories and art. The end result will be community-constructed portraits of the neighborhood through video that will be shared via a blog—a living document.

Keep an eye on laundromatproject.org for the latest on both of these.

@6 hours ago with 1 note
mysticalpsychosis:

Suzanne Lacy and Leslie Labowitz, In Mourning and In Rage
1977

mysticalpsychosis:

Suzanne Lacy and Leslie Labowitz, In Mourning and In Rage

1977

(Source: suzannelacy.com)

@6 hours ago with 1 note

hyunjucmdp:

The influential 1994 project: The Roof is on Fire! 
"Suzanne Lacy, Chris Johnson, and Annice Jacoby produced TEAM’s first large-scale performance art event, which featured 220 public high school students in unscripted and unedited conversations on family, sexuality, drugs, music, neighborhoods and the future as they sat in 100 cars parked on a rooftop garage."

@6 hours ago with 2 notes

SEAJ | Socially Engaged Art Journal 

(Source: seakart)

@6 hours ago with 1 note
failedprojects:

This research project has been on my mind since college. While I was a student, I attended a lot of classes that dealt with the idea of public art – somewhat influenced by Nicholas Bourriaud’s idea of relational art at the end of the 1990s. I wasn’t totally convinced by the idea that, for instance, installing a sculpture in a public space was a sufficient condition to define that work as public. After graduation, I started researching examples of public art, which really addressed the need of involving a wider audience outside the strict circles of connoisseurship. This is how I came across AIDS activist art – widely represented by the art collective Gran Fury that was working with ACT UP – and activist art movements which arose before them in the 1970s. I think these movements were perfect examples of how art can be really interfere with public opinion and contribute to social change.
via Silence = Death: Remembering New York’s Public Art of AIDS Activism – 032c Workshop

failedprojects:

This research project has been on my mind since college. While I was a student, I attended a lot of classes that dealt with the idea of public art – somewhat influenced by Nicholas Bourriaud’s idea of relational art at the end of the 1990s. I wasn’t totally convinced by the idea that, for instance, installing a sculpture in a public space was a sufficient condition to define that work as public. After graduation, I started researching examples of public art, which really addressed the need of involving a wider audience outside the strict circles of connoisseurship. This is how I came across AIDS activist art – widely represented by the art collective Gran Fury that was working with ACT UP – and activist art movements which arose before them in the 1970s. I think these movements were perfect examples of how art can be really interfere with public opinion and contribute to social change.

via Silence = Death: Remembering New York’s Public Art of AIDS Activism – 032c Workshop

@6 hours ago with 7 notes

RISK- Empathy, Art and Social Practice 

fullframechicago:

RISK- Empathy, Art and Social Practice

In many gallery settings it is common that the viewer only has a one-way connection to the art that is being exhibited. We are able to make a connection in one-way or another but we don’t usually encounter a connection made back. Currently on exhibit at…

@6 hours ago with 2 notes

social practice is a hot buzz word

sidewalkassembly:

“If you’re interested in doing work out in the world, you need another box of tools,” he says—tools that go beyond studio practice and art history. “You need classes on social theory, theories of politics, and theories of public space.”

SOCIAL PRACTICE THE NEW ILL ART 

@6 hours ago with 1 note

RE: OPEN ENGAGEMENT  

elsewheremuseum:

Reflections from Open Engagement, a national conference on Art and Social Practice.
George Scheer, Elsewhere Co-Founder + Director, June 2014
Last month a team of Elsewherians ventured to NY for Open Engagement, a three day conference on Art and Social Practice held at the Queens Museum….
@6 hours ago with 3 notes